Best Podcast Microphones

The Ultimate Podcast Microphone Guide 

Best Podcast Microphones

Posted May 2, 2019 | Updated August 20, 2020 | Jacob Bozarth & Dayton Cole

With 122 million search results in Google for the term podcast microphone, you may feel overwhelmed in your search for the best podcast microphone. Frankly a-lot of the top results out there may provide you with ill-informed information. The reality and truth is that many of these top ranking posts for the topic “best podcast microphone” are not written by audio experts who have actually used the podcast microphone they are recommending.

Now before you think I am just making an assumption and going off on a rant about this, let me explain. I recently read a popular article that linked to a post on the best podcast microphones. I reached out to the author of the podcast microphone post who also happens to be a well known podcast host who has a reputable site for podcasters. I was familiar with one of the podcast microphones that they recommended, so I decided to ask them what they liked about it and why they endorsed this particular microphone. I personally would not have recommended it myself, but I was interested to know why they liked it and maybe I would give it another shot. 

But to my surprise this was their response:  “I have never used the microphone. I wrote this article based off other reviews I found online about this particular mic.”

As an audio engineer and someone with a Degree in Audio Recording, this really bothered me. A well known podcaster and influencer, recommending a podcast microphone that they had never even used! Your podcast microphone is arguably the most important element when it comes to recording your podcast, and every podcaster will need a microphone, and you also need a source that you can trust. But what kind of microphone is the best for your recording setup?

Let’s take a look at our top recommended podcast microphones (all of which have been used and tested by our team and we can recommend based on professional experience!). Let’s dive straight in. 

Best Dynamic Podcast Microphones
  1. Electro-Voice RE20 – $399
  2. ElectroVoice RE320 – $295
  3. Shure SM7B – $399
  4. Audio-Technica AT2005 – $79
  5. Samson Q2U – $98 
  6. Aston Stealth – $379
Best Condenser Podcast Microphones
  1. Mojave MA-200 ($1,095)
  2. Neumann KMS 104 ($699)
  3. Neumann TLM 193 ($1500)
  4. Neumann M 147 ($2,900)
  5. Neumann U 47 FET ($4,000)
  6. Lauten Eden LT-386 ($2,999)
Before we look at each of these podcast microphones in detail, let’s discuss some microphone basics.

Your Voice is Unique 

Like many things in life, podcast microphones are not a one size fits all. Different voices and sources will sound different on different microphones. After all, this is why there are many different styles and kinds of microphones for different recording applications. If possible, I recommend trying out a few microphones before deciding which microphone is the best fit to record your podcast. Let’s discuss a few categories we will look at for each of these podcast microphones.

Frequency Response

The frequency range is how a microphone will pick up the range of low to high frequencies measured in hertz. Most of the energy in a human voice will be from 75Hz to 15kHz, making a microphone with at least this response a good candidate to record a podcast. Additionally, it is good to look at the frequency response curve of a microphone so you know where it has bumps and dips in the response as this will color the sound of your voice.

Microphone Types

What Are Dynamic Microphones? 

What Are Dynamic Microphones? ​

The microphones we recommend here are all dynamic microphones. We have found that many podcasters are not recording in a studio, and that is ok. Spare bedrooms, closets, offices, and conference rooms can make a great recording space. A dynamic microphone will best suit these types of scenarios while providing a great sounding recording. Dynamic microphones are normally less sensitive and will pick up less room noise than most condenser microphones.

What Are Condenser Microphones? 

What Are Condenser Microphones? ​

What about Condenser Microphones? According to Neumann, Condenser microphones usually offer much higher sensitivity and lower noise than dynamic microphones. In our podcast recording experience, we’ve seen this to be true. Condenser microphones are usually great for recording lead vocals for music and allow you to get a larger than life sounding podcast VO, but we strongly recommend a professionally treated studio or room if you decide to use a condenser microphone for podcasting. 

Polar Pattern 

 Polar pattern refers to the shape in which the microphone picks up or rejects sounds. Most of the microphones we look at are unidirectional mics meaning that they just pick up in one direction. Each of the microphones in this post will be cardioid, supercardioid, or hypercardioid. A cardioid pickup pattern allows the mic to pick up sound that is directly in front of the microphone and reduces pickup of unwanted sounds from the rear and side of the microphone. This type of polar pattern is ideal for recording a podcast with each guest having their own isolated microphone. The cardioid pattern looks like a heart or balloon shape coming out the front or side of the microphone.

Address Style 

Address style refers to what part of the microphone the diaphragm/pickup pattern is facing and allows you to know if you will speak into the front of the mic (like most handheld microphones) or the side of the mic (like most large diaphragm condenser microphones).

Connector Type 

Most of the microphones in this list are XLR connector type. This means that you will use them with a standard microphone cable and plug them into an interface, microphone preamp, or handheld recorder with XLR connectivity. A couple of the microphones in this list are also USB compatible which means you can use them with a computer with USB connectivity.

With all this podcast microphone knowledge, lets dive into the details of each of the microphones. We have put the list in order from most expensive to least.

Best Dynamic Microphones for Podcasting

Best Podcast Microphone

Probably the most iconic microphone of all time, at least in the broadcast industry, is the Electro-Voice RE-20. This microphone has been a workhorse for radio personalities and Voice over artists for decades. This iconic mic utilizes Electro-Voice’s patented Variable-D technology, which linearizes the microphone’s proximity effect. This allows the talent to be very close to the microphone giving you that bigger-than-life radio DJ voice, while minimizing some of the undesirable effects of proximity such as boomy sounding up close and thin sounding when farther away.

Since the RE-20 was released in 1968, Electrovoice has added a few more models which use their Variable-D technology: The RE-320 and the RE-27N/D. All three of these microphones look and function very similarly, however there are a few differences. We get questions from podcasters all the time about which of these three mics is ‘the best.’ While sound quality can certainly be subjective, we are going to go through the differences of these mics and which one might be best for you depending on your voice and application.

Technical Specs 

As mentioned earlier, all three of these mics feature the Variable-D technology. They are also all dynamic cardioid microphones, which is why they are ideal for broadcast. One big difference in these microphones is their frequency response: 

 

A comparison of the frequency response charts of the Electro-Voice RE20, RE320, and RE27N/D

Just looking at the EQ curves of these microphones you can see that the RE-20 employs the flattest frequency response, while the RE-320 and RE-27N/D have more of a boost in the higher frequencies.

Unlike the classic RE-20, the RE-320 and RE-27N/D each have an extra resonator dome and a newer microphone diaphragm design, which attributes to a brighter and higher output. This can be especially advantageous if you are recording in a noisy environment or don’t have a high-quality preamp.

With the tests that we did, we had to increase the gain on the RE-20 to better match the 320 and 27N/D, which resulted in a little bit more room noise, but all three of these microphones have relatively low self-noise as opposed to other dynamic microphones. We do recommend getting something to help with the gain discrepancy like a Cloudlifter ($149) if you decide to get an RE-20.

 

Features 

All three microphones have switches with different filtering options. On the RE-20 with the filtering switch in the on position, it tilts the lower frequencies down by 4.5 dB from 400-100Hz.

The RE-320 is designed to not only record voice, but it also has a frequency contour switch that is engineered specifically for kick drum. While this makes the 320 more versatile, we find that feature doesn’t work well for the voice as it takes a little bit too much mid-range out.

The RE27N/D is by far the most versatile of the three mics as it employs 3 filtering options. It has 2 bass tilt switches and a high-frequency filter contour. The high-frequency filter decreases the high frequency by 3 dB, which can help with some of the harshness that this mic has. This can be especially useful if you are doing an interview with two people where one voice might sound just fine in the flat position, but the other voice may be a little brighter and more sibilant. Utilizing the high-frequency roll-off could help tame the brighter voice. The 27N/D and 320 both have a neodymium magnet, which gives them 6 dB more gain than the RE-20.

The difference between the 27N/D and the 320 is the mic diaphragm. The RE-320 diaphragm is designed for a faster transient response, which is why Electro-Voice advertises this mic as a kick drum mic as well.

Sound Quality 

So the most important element is the sound quality of the microphones. All 3 sound great, however, there are some subtle differences that depend on the sound you are trying to achieve.

Frequency Response Charts of the RE20, RE320, and RE27N/D

The RE-20 is the flattest of the three microphones in terms of frequency response, which means it’s the most natural-sounding. The 320 and 27N/D are brighter than the Re-20, but the 27N/D is by far the brightest mic of the three. You often see the 27N/D on a lot of sports radio shows, so if you are going after an aggressive, in-your-face kind of tone, then the 27N/D could be for you.

If you are producing a story-driven narrative podcast, where you want a more natural/mellow sound, then the RE-20 would be our choice. The RE-320 is in between the RE-20 and RE-27N/D in terms of sound, but if you also imagine yourself wanting to record instruments as well, then the 320 is designed to handle that better than the other two mics.

Price

Last, but not least let’s talk about the price of these microphones. Right off the bat, your budget can determine which microphone you will buy. The least expensive of the three is the RE-320 ($299), followed by the RE-20 ($449), and lastly the most expensive of all of them is the RE-27N/D ($499).

Comparison of the price with a picture of the Electro-Voice RE20, RE320, RE27N/D

The RE-320 is made overseas, while the RE-20 and RE-27N/D are made in Lincoln, NE, so the location of the manufacturing plays a huge role in the price, but the RE-320 is still made from high-quality components. The $200 difference between the RE-320 and the RE-27N/D for some people can be the deciding factor. If you’re on a tight budget and want to save a few hundred bucks, then go with the RE-320. All three of these microphones sound great and can give you a professional sounding voice for your podcast. It all depends on the tone, style, and budget of your show. Below this section you will find an overview of each microphone individually, along with their specs. 

The legendary Electro-Voice RE20 has been used by broadcasters and podcasters from NPR, Tenderfoot TV, to ESPN. The RE20 use Electro Voices’ patented Variable D technology to minimize the proximity effect. Normally as you get closer to a microphone, the low frequency bass response increases, but not with the RE20. The Variable D technology controls the low frequency bass response of the microphone as you get closer, creating a smooth, warm, big, full, and transparent sound. The RE20 also features a supercardioid polar pattern, which helps isolate the sound of your voice while rejecting background noise that can creep in from behind the microphone. The RE20 is a recommended microphone for both the novice and advanced podcaster!

Frequency Response: 45Hz – 18kHz

Microphone Type: Dynamic

Polar Pattern: Super Cardioid

Address Style: Front Address 

Connector Type: XLR

The RE320 is likely my all time favorite podcast microphone! For the price you absolutely cannot beat it. The RE320 is, “A professional- grade dynamic microphone designed specifically for recording and sound reinforcement applications requiring extremely low noise and the best possible tonal and transient response. Ideal for capturing a wide variety of vocal and instrument sources, the RE320 delivers unparalleled detail, dynamic response, and pleasing natural tone.” This microphone allows you to record a pleasing natural tone for your podcast vocals. The RE320 looks similar to the legendary RE20 broadcast microphone and in our opinion sounds just a bit darker but very similar as well. The RE320 features a supercardioid polar pattern, which helps isolate the sound of your voice while rejecting background noise that can creep in from behind the microphone. If you only have $300 to spend on a microphone go with the RE320.

Frequency Response: 30Hz – 18kHz

Microphone Type: Dynamic

Polar Pattern: Super Cardioid

Address Style: Front Address 

Connector Type: XLR

The SM7B is a legendary microphone being used by many legends including Michael Jackson, Sheryl Crow, Sammy Hagar, John Paul White of The Civil Wars, Joe Rogan, and many more. The first time I recorded using the SM7B, I was struck by the warm transparent tone of the mic. The Shure SM7B is not just a contender in the podcasting space; it can compete with many other well known vocal microphones in the $1,000+ price range. The biggest downfall of the mic is the low output. For this reason, I recommend using it with a Cloudlifter mic activator to give the mic +25 dB of clean gain. You can’t go wrong with the Shure SM7B for your podcast mic. 

Frequency Response: 50Hz – 20kHz

Microphone Type: Dynamic

Polar Pattern: Cardioid

Address Style: Front Address 

Connector Type: XLR

The AT2005 is essentially the exact same microphone as the ATR2100. If they were the same price, I would actually pick the AT2005 as the winner due to the sleeker and more professional look of the mic. There are a few people that claim that they can hear the difference in sound, but we had a hard time distinguishing when we did our recording tests. The cosmetics are a bit different and the grill has a flat top, but other than that, it is essentially the same mic. You can compare the frequency response graph and the polar pattern graph to see that the ATR2100 and the AT2005 are essentially the same mic. 

Frequency Response: 50Hz – 15kHz

Microphone Type: Dynamic

Polar Pattern: Cardioid

Address Style: Front 

Connector Type: USB, XLR, ⅛” (headphones)

If you are looking to start a podcast on a budget the Samson Q2U may be the right fit for you. Like the ATR2100 it comes with both XLR and USB connectivity. Also very similar in design and sound the Samson Q2U outperforms many microphones that cost double the price. With a handy light and on/off switch this microphone is a great place to start a podcast. The versatility of this microphone is one of the things that makes it great. You can use the USB output to record directly to your computer or you can also use the XLR analog output and run the microphone into a recorder like the Zoom H6. For the price, you will not get a better podcast recording setup.

Frequency Response: 50Hz – 15kHz

Microphone Type: Dynamic

Polar Pattern: Cardioid

Address Style: Front 

Connector Type: USB, XLR, ⅛” (headphones)

When I first picked up the Aston Stealth I was amazed at the weight of the microphone. It’s pretty much just as long as the SM7B or RE-20 too. Much like other studio broadcast microphones, the Stealth is an end-addressed, cardioid, moving-coil, dynamic microphone. The internal shock mount is made of a unique Sorbothane material, which helps eliminate all kinds of vibrations that may be sent to the capsule. It also comes with a quick-release stand mount that connects to any typical boom stand, so you can set this mic up extremely fast without having to fiddle with an external shock mount.

While this is convenient, I find that I have to tighten the boom arm pretty tight in order to get the mic to stay in place since it is a heavy mic. The mic also has a built-in pop screen filter much like the SM7B, however, you cannot remove the screen on the mic. I also found that even with this built-in screen there were a good amount of popped plosives in our spoken word test recordings, so I would definitely recommend using another pop screen with this mic if you are recording a podcast or voiceover.

Watch our video review of the Aston stealth mic below to see it tested and compared to a Shure SM7B and an Electro-Voice RE20.

Specifications and Features 

  • End-addressed, cardiod, moving-coil, dynamic microphone
  • Internal shock mount 
  • Quick-Release Stand Mount 
  • 4 Discrete Signal Paths in 1 mic  
  • Works with and without 48V phantom power
4 Discrete Signal Paths 
  1. V1(Vocal 1) ideal for male vocal
  2. V2 (Vocal 2) ideal for female vocal
  3. G (Guitar) designed for any type of guitar ranging from delicate nylon string to raucous guitar cabs
  4. D (Dark) a vintage ribbon-esque setting
While you don’t have to use these settings exclusively for the sources listed above, these four discrete signal paths essentially give you four distinct sounding microphones. Since we are a podcasting company, we only tested this mic for a spoken word application. Right off the bat, the V1 and V2 settings sound great on the voice. Even though I have a male voice, I actually preferred the sound of V2 on my own voice because it minimized the plosives and it just seemed more natural-sounding based on my timbre. However, I found the V1 settings to work better on a deeper male voice and female voiceover as well. 
 
The sibilance was just a little too pronounced in the V2 setting for the female voice, so if I were recording a podcast interview with this microphone I would most likely just leave it set on the V1 setting. I definitely would not recommend the G setting on the voice as it was kind of thin and nasally sounding, but I’m sure it’s great for guitar. The D setting was very lush and full sounding, however, I can see how that tone would not work well for most modern-day broadcast applications as it probably is a little too dark in tone for spoken word. Again, the ‘G’ and ‘D’ settings are probably going to be more useful in a music application rather than a podcast or VO application.
Phantom Power 
The most interesting aspect of the Aston Stealth is that it works with and without 48V phantom power. Without phantom power (passive mode) the active circuit is bypassed and this mic functions with the simplest signal chain (like most dynamic mics). When 48V phantom power is applied, then it activates a built-in class A preamp, which gives the mic a ton of clean gain. This is an awesome feature because it means you do not need any kind of external gain lifting device such as a cloudlifter in order to boost the signal. Since dynamic mics have a relatively low output compared to condenser mics, they can be prone to having a lot of noise added to the signal by having to crank up the preamp, but with the Aston Stealth that problem is solved with this built-in circuit. I actually prefer the way this mic sounds with the preamp enabled even though it is a ridiculous amount of gain (40dB). To accommodate all of that extra gain I had to enable the pad on the Apollo x6 when doing the listening tests. Overall, the voice seems to pop out more with phantom power enabled.
Best Podcast Microphone

Sound Quality 

For our sound tests, we put the Aston Stealth up against the Electro-Voice RE20 and Shure SM7B and recorded male and female narration. We even did tests utilizing the internal preamp on the Stealth while running the RE20 and SM7B through a cloudlifter to compare how these mics sound with some clean gain going into an Apollo x6.
After some blind listening tests, our team of engineers preferred the SM7B on the male voice as it was the most natural sounding, with the RE20 close behind, which has a more in-your-face radio sound. While the Aston Stealth did not sound horrible, we felt like it didn’t sound as smooth or natural as the RE20 or SM7B especially in the upper frequencies. The frequency response of the stealth emphasizes some upper frequencies that our engineers did not particularly like on the voice. Also, the built-in pop screen filter did not do a good job at reducing or minimizing plosives, so I definitely would use a pop screen filter on this mic for recording voiceover. Even though we would not put the Stealth ahead of the RE20 or SM7B for podcasters, it definitely is not a bad alternative.
 
Ease of Use 
Since the Aston Stealth has a lot of features you don’t see on any other microphone, there is a little bit of a learning curve to get this mic up and optimally running. It definitely takes some practice to switch between the different voice modes, but that’s designed intentionally to make it harder to accidentally switch the settings while recording. I found it extremely difficult to quickly change between voice modes in a session, which is not ideal if you are in a time crunch and need to track at a fast pace. Activating the built-in preamp circuit within the mic is as simple as engaging phantom power on your preamp or interface. It’s really cool to be able to get all of that clean gain without having to connect the mic to anything else in your signal chain. The built-in preamp circuit is definitely my favorite feature on the Stealth as it gives the mic a more condenser-like quality.
At first, I thought the mic clip that connects to the boom arm seemed very cheap and I was skeptical that it would even support the weight of the microphone, but the Stealth sits very securely on the stand and it hasn’t fallen off yet (knock on wood). Even though changing between the voice modes is clunky, setting up the mic onto the mic clip is very fast and is a really innovative design. The lip at the bottom of the microphone also makes it impossible to use certain types of XLR cables such as right-angle cables.
 
Price
The Aston Stealth is currently $379.99, which is pretty amazing when you think about all of the features of this microphone. Even though the SM7B ($399) and RE-20 ($449) are around the same price we typically recommend using a cloudlifter with those mics, which can cost an additional $149. If you are on a budget, looking for a more versatile mic, or don’t want to spend the money on an external gain lifting device, then the Aston Stealth is worth a look.
 
Final Verdict on the Aston Stealth 
Even though we only tested this mic in a podcasting application, I can certainly see why Aston makes the claim that this is the most versatile microphone on the market. The 4 voice settings each have their own flavor, which makes this a very versatile mic. It’s very quiet with almost no noise and the built-in circuit is a huge bonus that’s ideal for people who don’t have a good quality preamp to begin with. This mic also has really good off-axis rejection, so it would be great for a podcast interview with two mics or if you are recording in a noisy environment or untreated room. I did some tests in a large untreated office space with a bunch of people working around me and the Stealth did a great job at minimizing the sound of the environment around me. If I was shopping around for a VO mic or a podcast microphone I would probably recommend either the Shure SM7B or Electro-Voice RE-20 over the Stealth simply because I think those mics sound better for voiceover and interview work.
Overall, the Aston Stealth is a really interesting design with some very cool features. It’s an extremely versatile mic at an affordable price. Even though the Aston Stealth is not my first choice for a podcast microphone, the other competitors could certainly learn a thing or two from Aston Microphones as their internal preamp design is extremely innovative, which is definitely needed in the podcast industry.
 

Frequency Response: 20Hz – 20kHz (+/-3dB)

Microphone Type: Dynamic

Polar Pattern: Cardioid

Address Style: Front 

Connector Type: XLR

Best Condenser Microphones for Podcasting

In the age of digital audio, digital artifacts are a prevalent issue. But the Mojave MA-200 claims to have “none of the shrillness and high frequency distortion artifacts that are often encountered with modern condenser microphones.” But for a tube microphone, we felt that it was a little on the brittle side in terms of high-end frequency response. Overall, this microphone is likely better suited for recording singing, but still could be applied to dialogue and voiceover situations. Fun fact, this is the microphone we use to record voiceover for the hit podcast Culpable and it sounds great on the hosts voice. 

Dayton’s Opinion: 

Sounded better on female voiceover than male voiceover

Might be better suited for recording singing 

Pat’s Opinion: 

High end issue – sounds really brittle and harsh

This caused a problem on the sibilance of the female voice, but also for the male vocals

Microphone Type: Tube Condenser 

Polar Pattern: Cardioid

Address Style: Side

Connector Type: XLR

Thinking about hosting a live podcast recording? Want to record a microphone and actually be able to hold the microphone as you record? This is the perfect microphone. Neumann claims that this microphone is perfectly designed with the benefits of a powerful condenser microphone, all in the body of a microphone perfectly suited for the stage. 

In addition, Neumann claims that the mic is equipped to clearly record “percussion, saxophone, trumpet, trombone, harmonica, acoustic guitar, and guitar cabinets.” This microphone provides a balanced and full sound, applicable for both male and female vocals. We highly recommend the Neumann KMS 104! 

Dayton’s Opinion: 

Male and female voice sounded balanced and full 

Pat’s Opinion: 

Balanced, good sound

Frequency Response: 20Hz-20kHz

Microphone Type: Condenser

Polar Pattern: Cardioid

Address Style: Front

Connector Type: XLR

If you’re looking for a consistent microphone that just works, the TLM 193 will work for you. Suitable for a wide range of studio applications, the Neumann TLM 193 claims the ability to “capture the source and its room ambiance without unwanted coloration.” As our engineers mentioned in the comments below, this mic just does its job. It wasn’t all that inspiring and didn’t have a lot of warmth or depth to it, but simply performed as a middle-tier option might. Frankly, we were underwhelmed by this microphone based on the price range, but the one beauty of this microphone is its streamlined design, lack of buttons, and consistent performance. With a fairly flat frequency response, this microphone allows for a wide range of changes to be made in post-production. 

Dayton’s Opinion: 

EQ on the male sounded a little off. Overall middle of the road performance. 

Pat’s Opinion: 

Sounded better on female. Didn’t like how it sounded on male dialogue

Frequency Response: 20Hz-20kHz

Microphone Type: Condenser

Polar Pattern: Cardioid

Address Style: Side 

Connector Type: XLR

Transitioning to one of three tube microphones we tested out, the Neumann M 147 offers a grittier, warmer tone for those podcasters who want to reinstate a sense of depth and character to their sound in the age of digital audio recording. According to the manufacturer, this microphone is “ideally suited for vocals, both male and female, as well as speech applications such as voice-over and film dubbing.” This is a respectable microphone, and we like the warm tone that it provides, but Pat was largely uninspired by this one.

Dayton’s Opinion: 

“Warm.” Female had more low end. Male sounded more round 

Pat’s Opinion: 

“Uninspired.” Neutral on this mic 

Frequency Response: 20Hz-20kHz

Microphone Type: Tube Condenser

Polar Pattern: Cardioid

Address Style: Side 

Connector Type: XLR

Housed in a beautiful wooden case, with all of the legacy and history of 70’s rock and roll, the Neumann U 47 is a high price tag that Dayton thinks “could work well to cut through a dense mix.” Probably more suited for singing vocals and recording some instruments, the Neumann U 47 FET is an iconic microphone in many recording studios, but isn’t ideal for podcasting dialogue or voiceover, as it has  a harsher high end then the other microphones in this shootout. 

Dayton’s Opinion: 

Warm with more top end than the other ones. Probably better for singing vocals than dialogue. Too harsh for female vocals. Could work well to cut through a dense mix.

Pat’s Opinion: 

Sounded better on the male dialogue. 

Frequency Response: 40Hz-16kHz

Microphone Type: Condenser

Polar Pattern: Cardioid

Address Style: Side 

Connector Type: XLR

Transitioning away from the Nuemann microphones, the Lauten Eden is a big and shiny tube microphone with a fairly balanced frequency response. However, we were surprised that this microphone didn’t have a very shiny top end. In fact, it was rather dull. It just doesn’t seem to correspond to the shiny gloss on the outside of the microphone.

If you record your podcast on video, this microphone would be a wonderful microphone simply based on the look. It’s classy, clean design will look excellent in many different contexts. 

Dayton’s Opinion: 

Fairly balanced. Too dark sounding on the female. Less top end overall than the rest of these mics.  

Pat’s Opinion: 

Despite the chrome, shiny look of this mic it sounded “Dull” and “lumpy.” 

Frequency Response: 40Hz-16kHz

Microphone Type: Tube Condenser

Polar Pattern: Cardioid

Address Style: Side 

Connector Type: XLR

Popular Podcast Microphones

We’ve already shared our favorite dynamic and condenser microphones for podcasting, but the reality is that there are hundreds of microphones on the market today. Some of the other popular microphones in the podcasting space, that didn’t make the top of our list are the Blue Yetti, Rode Procaster, Heil PR-40, and Shure MV51. While these mics are not bad in and of themselves, our engineers have decided that they are not the best equipment to recommend to our clients. You will have the best luck for podcasting purposes by going with one of the recommended mics above. 

Popular Podcast Microphones (we don’t recommend)
  1. Blue Yeti – $129
  2. Heil PR-40 – $329
  3. Rode Procaster – $229
  4. Blue Snowball – $102
  5. Shure MV51 – $199
  6. SamsonMeteorite – $40

Microphone Accessories and Necessities 

Mic Stand 

Broadcast Boom Arm 

We recommend using a microphone stand with a boom arm to avoid unwanted sounds being picked up from your desk or tabletop. A boom arm will also allow you to adjust the microphone so you and your guests feel comfortable.

Pop filter 

Windscreen

A pop filter is a cheap way to prevent burst of air or pops from making it into your recordings.

When recording a podcast, isolation is very important. That’s why we recommend closed back headphones when recording. Need recommendation on what headphones to get? Check out this post!

Most dynamic microphones have relatively low gain outputs. The Cloud Microphone Cloudlifters will give your podcast microphone up to 25 dB or ultra clean gain and can make a cheap preamp sound much better. We have found the cloudlifter’s also add a bit of a warm tone to the podcast microphone when putting it in your signal flow.

These are usually made of tiny bungee or rubber band-like cords that suspend your mic in the air and prevent it from touching the microphone stand. They can help eliminate sounds that may resonate through your microphone stand and into the recording due to movement. Most shock mounts are made to go with specific models of mics, so make sure to get one that fits your microphone.

Conclusion

Selecting a microphone can be a big decision in your podcasting career. We are thankful that you have allowed us to be apart of helping you make this decision. In addition to recording a podcast and selecting a microphone, we know that podcasting can be hard. At Resonate Recordings it is our mission to make podcasting easy. If you have questions about our services or want to offload the editing or production of your podcast, our team of professional engineers are here to help! Feel free to schedule a call or drop us a line here. Cheers and happy podcasting!

JB Headshot square

Jacob Bozarth

As President & CEO of Resonate Recordings, Jacob leads the team & oversees the vision and growth. Jacob can be found recording, producing, & mixing podcasts when he is not spending time with his family. Jacob & his family live in Louisville, KY.

Dayton Cole

Dayton Cole

As Lead Mixing Engineer at Resonate Recordings, Dayton oversees the audio editing and mixing process for many entertaining podcasts. When Dayton is not mixing and mastering audio he enjoys making tacos with his wife in their home in Louisville, KY.